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Posted: Mon Apr 26, 2010 2:26 pm
by russellhltn
kisaac wrote:Who does the folding, and how much time does just this "folding" take? We've discussed a folded bulletin, but the extra time to fold them seemed troubling.


I've seen at least one ward that does a tri-fold style, but they pass them out as a single unfolded sheet of paper. The end result is they get a lot of mileage out of the space.

Posted: Wed Apr 28, 2010 12:01 pm
by jeromer7
kisaac wrote:Who does the folding, and how much time does just this "folding" take?

We are currently making 70 copies each week. I haven't timed it, but our process goes like this:
1. Set the ward copier up for duplex copying and start making the copies.
2. I count the copies as they are dispensed by the copier and at every 5th or 6th copy, I pull them out and fold them in half as a group. I use my thumbnail to do a fairly tight crease.
3. Hand the folded copies to my wife and wait for the next batch.
4. My wife seperates the 5 (or 6) copies into individual bulletins and presses down on the creased edge on the counter to get them a tad tighter. She turns around and usually has to wait 30 seconds to a minute for me to hand her the next bunch.

Using the above process, we have a stack of individual folded bulletins less than a minute after all copies are made. The time spent is essentially the same as the time to make the copies. My guess is this takes less than 15 minutes start to finish for 70 copies.

I have done this once by myself when my wife couldn't come to the library with me and I was still able to pretty much keep up with the copier. Your results may vary if you have a speedy copier.

An alternate approach is to make all the copies and them fold them separately. I'd still recommend folding 5-8 in a stack, separating the stack, pressing the creased edge, and repeating. I think our 70 copies could be folded this way in 10 minutes or a little less.

I also do the program for our stake conferences. Those 600-700 copies are copied and folded by a local printer.

Posted: Tue May 11, 2010 1:44 pm
by seguetester-p40
OK, I will throw my template in to the mix too. The template is in a constant state of change but has been in its current state as attached for about 6 months. I have been doing the program for nearly 3 years. I can do all of the information updates in about 45 minutes. It is tri-fold on 8.5" x 14". the boxes help determine fold points so it is really pretty simple. It takes about 20 minutes to print the 75 copies each week and I can fold them as fast as they come out of the printer. So...start to finish is about 70 minutes. An yes, I am aware that I am using the logo...who knows if it is authorized or not. My bishop doesn't seem to mind so I am ok with it.

Posted: Tue May 11, 2010 1:53 pm
by seguetester-p40
OK, I will throw my template in to the mix too. I have been doing the program for about 3 years now. It has gone through about 5 or 6 format changes and is in a constant state of flux. Its current format as attached has been in use for a few months. We no longer have a printed stake directory/calendar so you will note lots of contact information and stake calendar items that attempt to compensate for this.

It takes me about 45 minutes to update all of the content and about 20 minutes to print 75 copies. Prints are double sided of course and are on 8.5"x14" paper. I can fold the programs as fast as they come out of the printer so it takes about 70 minutes start to finish for the entire tasks...on a good week. I do fold each program individually and each program receives 2 fold of course. The printed content boxes make folding easy since you know exactly where both folds need to be made.

And yes, I am aware that I am using the official logo. Is it a correct or authorized use....I am not sure. But, my bishop is fine with it so I am too.

3 column ward bulletin

Posted: Wed Sep 22, 2010 11:53 am
by jarishansen
Here's an excellent 3-column format. We saw it on vacation and got a copy of it to use in our own ward, so I can't take credit for it.

It's a trifold program with a photo and/or quote on the front page. Open up the first fold and you see the sacrament meeting program and announcements. Open it further and you get to the ward calendar and lesson schedules. On the back is a leadership directory with phone numbers.

Well organized and very informative.

Posted: Sat Jan 15, 2011 9:56 pm
by grdnia
Thank you so much! I just got called to do the bulletins and was finding it very difficult to come up with a template I liked and that worked for me. This has made my first one get out smoothly. :)

Posted: Sat Mar 05, 2011 9:53 pm
by nverrill
Using the church name on the bulletin is fine. It is an introduction to visitors to our services and therefore should state what services they are attending and the name of the church where they are being held. Also, the person making the ward bulletin is representing the church in doing so and that also authorizes it's use.

According to copyright laws a representative of a firm may use it's logo, photocopy it's documents etc. Anyone making a ward bulletin is just that, a representative of the church, and therefore may use church owned images, quotes, the logo and other content with out violation of any laws.

For example, as a teacher of a Sunday School or primary class you can even make copies of the friend or Ensign without violation of copyright laws because you are acting as a representative of the church to distribute it's materials to it's members. Not to mention that this example falls under education categories of copyright law and is therefore okay to use anyhow.

I used to work in a print shop and was thoroughly educated on copyright laws to avoid lawsuits.

Posted: Sat Mar 05, 2011 10:41 pm
by Mikerowaved
nverrill wrote:Using the church name on the bulletin is fine. It is an introduction to visitors to our services and therefore should state what services they are attending and the name of the church where they are being held. Also, the person making the ward bulletin is representing the church in doing so and that also authorizes it's use.

According to copyright laws a representative of a firm may use it's logo, photocopy it's documents etc. Anyone making a ward bulletin is just that, a representative of the church, and therefore may use church owned images, quotes, the logo and other content with out violation of any laws.

For example, as a teacher of a Sunday School or primary class you can even make copies of the friend or Ensign without violation of copyright laws because you are acting as a representative of the church to distribute it's materials to it's members. Not to mention that this example falls under education categories of copyright law and is therefore okay to use anyhow.

I used to work in a print shop and was thoroughly educated on copyright laws to avoid lawsuits.

We need to be careful about making generalized statements about the church's intellectual property. They set the rules regarding the use, or non-use, of their logos, typefaces, images, music, publications, etc. Some things they have made clear we can copy, such as most (but not all) hymns out of the Hymn Book. There are other things we can't freely copy.

Regarding use of their official logo and typeface, they have spelled it out pretty clear in Section 21.1.10 of Handbook 2. Anyone with questions regarding Intellectual Property usage are encouraged to contact them directly for clarification. Contact information can be found at the above link.

Posted: Sun Mar 06, 2011 12:47 am
by jdlessley
nverrill wrote:[T]he person making the ward bulletin is representing the church in doing so and that also authorizes it's use.

According to copyright laws a representative of a firm may use it's logo, photocopy it's documents etc. Anyone making a ward bulletin is just that, a representative of the church, and therefore may use church owned images, quotes, the logo and other content with out violation of any laws.
Be very careful in giving legal advice. Even a lawyer (or should I say especially lawyers) will not make generalized statements such as those made here.

As a body membership of the Church we do not legally represent the Church. We are not employees with representative rights or authority as found in commercial or corporate entities. Even for commercial entities only corporate officers and certain employees have recognized authority to represent the company. Within a ward the bishop is the only one with limited legal authority to represent the Church.

To cover such situations as unit bulletins the Church has published instructions outlining suitable uses of the logotype and the Church name (see Handbook 2: Administering the Church, 21.1.10). Those instructions should be followed. Most Church publications include applicable use instructions to include suitability to reproduce or copy for such situations as internal or home use. Some require prior written consent or even prohibit reproduction or copying because of copyright agreements. You will find that some documents, such as Handbook 1, specifically prohibit reproduction or copying except under specific restricted situations.

nverrill wrote:For example, as a teacher of a Sunday School or primary class you can even make copies of the friend or Ensign without violation of copyright laws because you are acting as a representative of the church to distribute it's materials to it's members. Not to mention that this example falls under education categories of copyright law and is therefore okay to use anyhow.
While Church members and Sunday School or other class or quorum instructors may copy Friend, Ensign, Liahona, or other publications of this nature, it is not because they are acting as a representative of the Church. It is because advance permission has been granted to do so. You can find this permission inside each publication that reads like this one found in the Ensign
Copyright information: Text and visual material in the Ensign may be copied for incidental, noncommercial church or home use. Visual material may not be copied if restrictions are indicated in the credit line with the artwork. Copyright questions should be addressed to Intellectual Property Office...
As you can see even with this permission there are restrictions.

nverrill wrote:I used to work in a print shop and was thoroughly educated on copyright laws to avoid lawsuits.
Dispensing legal advice without the appropriate license to do so is the one thing that could get you into a legal trouble.

Posted: Tue Apr 05, 2011 8:57 pm
by nverrill
jdlessley wrote:Be very careful in giving legal advice. Even a lawyer (or should I say especially lawyers) will not make generalized statements such as those made here.

As a body membership of the Church we do not legally represent the Church. We are not employees with representative rights or authority as found in commercial or corporate entities. Even for commercial entities only corporate officers and certain employees have recognized authority to represent the company. Within a ward the bishop is the only one with limited legal authority to represent the Church.

To cover such situations as unit bulletins the Church has published instructions outlining suitable uses of the logotype and the Church name (see Handbook 2: Administering the Church, 21.1.10). Those instructions should be followed. Most Church publications include applicable use instructions to include suitability to reproduce or copy for such situations as internal or home use. Some require prior written consent or even prohibit reproduction or copying because of copyright agreements. You will find that some documents, such as Handbook 1, specifically prohibit reproduction or copying except under specific restricted situations.

While Church members and Sunday School or other class or quorum instructors may copy Friend, Ensign, Liahona, or other publications of this nature, it is not because they are acting as a representative of the Church. It is because advance permission has been granted to do so. You can find this permission inside each publication that reads like this one found in the Ensign As you can see even with this permission there are restrictions.

Dispensing legal advice without the appropriate license to do so is the one thing that could get you into a legal trouble.


Thanks for your concern. I was not giving legal advise of any type as the post indicates. I was simply stating from my person experience and training. The points you made are good clarification of what my post already stated.