Celiac disease

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jaj78
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Postby jaj78 » Tue Mar 08, 2011 7:21 pm

I guess it depends on the sensitivity of the ward members. Our ward has a couple of families with celiac, and we had tried using a single tray (the YM bring bread AND rice cakes) and targeting the assigned route, but the families kept moving where they sat. So now we have 4-5 pieces of rice cake in every tray with the bread. In our case, the contamination issues aren't very severe, so the rice and gluten in the same tray haven't been a problem.

crisa
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Postby crisa » Wed Mar 09, 2011 8:36 am

We only have a couple of people in our ward with this issue. In our circumstance, the gluten free product is wrapped and placed on the tray with the other bread. The people who have this issue have also been asked to sit in the same location so that it can be placed on the same tray each time.

ferrinl
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Re: Celiac disease

Postby ferrinl » Fri Oct 17, 2014 7:33 am

Glad someone raised the topic of celiac. It is technical, so it belongs on this discussion board. It is just as technical, as far as I view it, as avoiding getting ebola while caring for someone with ebola as a healthcare worker is technical, requiring one to use correct and careful procedures in order to avoid cross contamination. Celiacs are treated as if they just have to make do with cross-contamination and sickness, due to other people's lack of knowledge and awareness, if they want to take the sacrament at church, in most wards, simply because the disease is not common and people don't understand what is does and what its consequences are.

Cross-contamination is real. Kudos to those who care enough about and love their sisters and brothers who have celiac disease enough to lead out in at least providing separate "gluten-free" labelled trays for them so that there is no risk of their food mixing with gluten-bread and becoming dangerously cross-contaminated in this way. Gluten-free items should never be on the same tray or table or cloth with things containing gluten.

Celiacs require gluten-free food, not merely casually gluten-less food, the latter being usually all you can get for sacrament, even if you bring your own gluten-free food for them to use. Once it goes on the same tray as gluten, it is no longer gluten-free. Even trace amounts of gluten are dangerous to people who have celiac. It is a rare disease, which is why most people don't know this.

Celiacs who are honoring their bodies and living fruitful lives generally have to spend a small fortune purchasing gluten-free soap, lotions, hairspray, shampoo, conditioner, toothpaste, floss, and foods like oats that were processed in facilities that don't also process wheat ($9.00 for a small package). We have to be SO careful in order to maintain our health.

Oats in and of themselves contain no wheat gluten, but if they are processed on shared equipment like they are for or at companies such as Quaker, they are dangerous and harmful to celiacs. They might as well eat straight wheat bread if they are going to be careless and eat the cheaper regular version of oats that is likely cross-contaminated with wheat.

Ingesting wheat literally attacks their small intestines, causing them to then not absorb their foods' nutrients properly or at all and also causing many women with the disease to become anemic. It also causes leaky gut, which then results in kidney problems and cause celiacs to eventually become allergic, in varying degrees to ALL foods, as their undigested food seeps out of their leaky guts and into the bloodstream. So, when people think it just causes an upset stomach for an hour or a day or two, or for a few hours, they have no idea.

It can also eventually cause lymphoma if left untreated. It is truly a nasty disease, with no cure, and the only treatment and relief is to avoid all traces of wheat and barley entirely, which then makes celiacs who are obedient to this entirely strictly wheat-free diet, symptom-free after being on the diet for a couple of years and not breaching it. Being carefully and diligently wheat-free over a long period of time--i.e., the rest of a celiac's life after diagnosis--will gradually heal, at least partially, their intestines from the ravages of what ingesting wheat has done to them.

There needs to be this kind of education among those in charge of any kind of food handling and preparation at church. I think it's also wise to avoid shaking hands with anyone who has just eaten a cookie or a sandwich, i.e., handled wheat gluten, unless they had an entirely gluten-free cookie or sandwich.

Hand sanitizer doesn't get gluten off of the hands. Hands must be washed with soap and water in order to remove it and preferably this needs to be done before the gluten begins to absorb into the skin and then the bloodstream. For something like the Lord's Sacrament, which is an important ordinance to us who are LDS, required of all for each person's salvation, a safe Sacrament should be made available to all people, including those of us who suffer from celiac disease and whose only treatment for the disease is to diligently, carefully, and entirely avoid traces of wheat.

Those who are not diagnosed with celiac but who merely are experimenting with the "gluten-free" diet are not to be confused with people who genuinely have celiac disease. Those merely trying out the diet for purposes other than having been diagnosed with celiac tend to not be careful or diligent in avoiding wheat entirely, from what I have observed, nor do they need to be. However, people with celiac disease, to avoid suffering and a slew of health problems, generally actually need to live by a high and strict standard in avoiding wheat or they will get sick and continue to be sick. Hopefully, these explanations make sense, because there is a lot of confusion and misinformation out there among non-celiacs and even among some with celiac who don't fully yet understand what they have.

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sbradshaw
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Re: Celiac disease

Postby sbradshaw » Wed Mar 04, 2015 2:36 pm

I'm glad bread is the only thing we have to worry about :)
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davesudweeks
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Re: Celiac disease

Postby davesudweeks » Thu Mar 05, 2015 11:42 am

As a suggestion for another possible solution, my daughter is in a ward with quite a few gluten-intolerant folks. I believe they clean the trays each Sunday (3 wards share the building) and several members provide gluten-free bread for use in the sacrament (for the entire ward). My grandson has been on and off gluten (for a different reason) and my daughter takes a turn at bringing the gluten-free bread. The last time I attended her meetings, I think the bread was homemade. If it is important to the discussion, I will see her this weekend and can ask about the details.

MelissaRenee
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Re: Celiac disease

Postby MelissaRenee » Tue Mar 24, 2015 8:10 am

My ward has a dedicated gluten free section (one "column" of short pews) and a dedicated gf tray. Standard procedures are that the gf bread is broken first, a napkin is placed over it and then the rest of the bread is broken. As far as I am aware, this system has worked well in a ward that has members that need to be completely gf (as in having a gf substitute touching regular bread could make them seriously ill). The bishopric reminds people of this from time to time during announcements.

I believe that the gf bread is kept in the freezer so the Aaronic Priesthood can just pull out the required number of pieces as gf bread is quite expensive.

lehrschallbrian
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Re: Celiac disease

Postby lehrschallbrian » Sun Apr 12, 2015 8:01 am

We have a lady in our ward who makes our sacrament bread and it is gluten free for the entire ward.

silus99
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Re: Celiac disease

Postby silus99 » Fri Jun 26, 2015 4:05 pm

I appreciate everyone's comments as we too have about 5 with various levels of intolerance or diagnosed cases. Currently they bring their own bread. I have not wanted the liability of a Teacher bringing bread at the last minute and it is not gluten free. They place it on a tray and sit in the same seats each week, like many families in the Church.

My current concern in regards to cross contamination is the breaking of the bread. Right now those members bring their own small piece and the priests don't break it. I know in the handbook it talks about breaking the bread and I understand the requirement in emulation of what the Savior showed us as the proper procedure. So my question is if others have their priests break the gluten free portions, or do not due to concerns about cross contamination? I would like to make this as easy and reverent as possible and also not have members worried about taking the sacrament.

I will ask my Stake President for guidance, but wanted to hear more ideas or thoughts of how to best make the ordinance both sacred and safe.

Thanks!

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Re: Celiac disease

Postby russellhltn » Fri Jun 26, 2015 4:17 pm

silus99 wrote:So my question is if others have their priests break the gluten free portions, or do not due to concerns about cross contamination? I would like to make this as easy and reverent as possible and also not have members worried about taking the sacrament.

I will ask my Stake President for guidance, but wanted to hear more ideas or thoughts of how to best make the ordinance both sacred and safe.

Since we're only worried about cross-contamination in one direction, my thought is to have the priest wash their hands and break the gluten-free first.

I think the trick would be how to make sure that happens and how everyone knows that tray is the gluten-free tray. I think I'd try to make the tray different somehow. Perhaps a label on the handle.
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silus99
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Re: Celiac disease

Postby silus99 » Sat Jun 27, 2015 7:06 am

russellhltn wrote:
silus99 wrote:So my question is if others have their priests break the gluten free portions, or do not due to concerns about cross contamination? I would like to make this as easy and reverent as possible and also not have members worried about taking the sacrament.

I will ask my Stake President for guidance, but wanted to hear more ideas or thoughts of how to best make the ordinance both sacred and safe.

Since we're only worried about cross-contamination in one direction, my thought is to have the priest wash their hands and break the gluten-free first.

I think the trick would be how to make sure that happens and how everyone knows that tray is the gluten-free tray. I think I'd try to make the tray different somehow. Perhaps a label on the handle.


That is good advice. I will work on the finer points. Thanks!


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