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Posted: Fri Jul 27, 2012 2:44 pm
by KeithWilson
I have not yet set this up, which do you recommend? The electrician will wire whatever I ask him to do. I would like to be able to control it from a laptop.

If I don't have to buy a Sony RM-BR300 I don't want to. That's one expensive controller.

Posted: Fri Jul 27, 2012 8:41 pm
by michaelfish
I would have the contractor terminate the CAT5 cable with RJ45 jacks and wall plates. Adapters can then be used for many types of connections.

If using a PC/Laptop to control the camera, a USB port on the computer could be connected to a USB-to-RS232 adapter (which converts from USB to RS232 serial communications and DB9 connector). Then use a DB9-to-RJ45 cordand plug into the RJ45 jack in the wall plate. (see Note)

For connecting to the camera, go straight from the RJ45 jack in the wall plate to a RJ45 plug to 8-pin mini din. Plug that into the camera.

Note: I've looked for USB-to-RS232 adapters with a RJ45 plug instead of a DB9 serial connector, but haven't located any yet.

Posted: Mon Jul 30, 2012 8:35 pm
by TerryLittlewood
You mentioned that one option to mix graphics with the live video was to use an IPAD. Could you expand on that and detail the hardware and software requirements to make that happen?

michaelfish wrote:Keith,

I have a couple of suggestions for you to consider.



I would recommend some way of disconnecting power to the camera. If PTZ control stops working in the middle of a conference, you may have to reboot the camera to restore control. This would require a way to disconnect power from the camera.

In professional set ups, a CAT5 cable supplies power to the camera (using as many as all 8 conductors). It may be to your advantage to run an extra CAT5 for power instead of the expense of the contractor installing conduit and electric. CAT5 cables are now used for many types of signals including Ethernet, RS-232 serial, RS-422 VISCA, composite video, S-Video, HD Video (component, RGB, DVI and HDMI), power, etc. It does require adapters or baluns but these are cheaper than the parts/labor the contractor would charge for running conduit and installing an electrical outlet and allow you to disconnect power remotely.



Composite video signals are very complex and should not be split. Use a video distribution amplifier instead. If you meant to say "the video would go to the switch" instead of splitter, that would be OK.



You have several options for that one. You could use a 3-way video switch, and iPad (or laptop and scan converter). Create a PowerPoint presentation with the hymns and connect the iPad video adapter (or laptop's VGA out to the scan converter and video from the scan converter) to the video switch. Then just switch from any camera to the PowerPoint with the video switch.

Or you could invest in a video switcher. You could then connect all cameras and scan converter to the switcher and cleanly switch or dissolve between angles, superimpose hymn lyrics or names/callings over video. For example, if you were to invest $350 in a Videonics MX-1 video mixer and $50 in a VGA scan converter, you could get the following results:

Superimposed hymn lyrics...



Priesthood advancements...



Name and calling...



These shots were made possible with an investment of $400 and we got comments like "I thought we were watching general conference..."



BTW, is there any possibility that the Webcast Communicator software would be able to do this in the near future?

Posted: Mon Jul 30, 2012 10:39 pm
by michaelfish
You mentioned that one option to mix graphics with the live video was to use an IPAD. Could you expand on that and detail the hardware and software requirements to make that happen?
Superimposing text over video is not possible with a simple A/B video switch. However, the switch can be used to cut from a live video feed to Hymn text over a black background.
If you have a video mixer capable of producing a chroma-key or luminance-key, this is the hardware needed:
  1. Video mixer with chroma-key (Videonics MX-1 or equivalent)
  2. Live video feed from a camera
  3. Video output of white text over a solid color background (from an iPad, PC, laptop, video camera, etc.) You may need to purchase an A/V cable for the iPad.
Procedure:
  1. Use any program you wish (such as PowerPoint, Keynote or CloudOn) to create slides of a black background with white letters of the first two lines of a Hymn in the lower third portion of the screen. Create additional slides for all remaining lyrics.
  2. Plug the camera video into video input A of the MX-1
  3. Plug the PC/iPad video into video input D of the MX-1
  4. Connect the output of the MX-1 to the Webcast video input
  5. Play the slideshow
  6. Activate chroma-keying (select camera source on the top A-D row, the iPad/PC video source on the bottom A-D row, press Compose, Chroma-Key, OK)
From the MX-1 manual:
[B]Chroma Key and Luminance Key. “Keying” replaces parts of one picture with another, based on their lightness (luminance key) or color (chroma key).
[/B]To use the chroma-key feature of the Videonics MX-1 and superimpose graphics (Hymns) over live video (example), all that is needed is a stable composite or s-video source with white letters over a solid color background (usually black) and a second video source (camera) for live video. When the MX-1 creates a chroma-key, the solid background color (black) is replaced with the live video from the camera and the white letters are superimposed over the live video. It's how TV stations show the weather map behind the talent (they use a green wall or screen to produce the solid color for the keying background).

We usually use a laptop and PowerPoint but any white text over a solid color background will work. Since the iPad has an option to output standard composite video, it could be used connected and connected to one of the MX-1's switcher inputs.

Posted: Tue Jul 31, 2012 11:20 am
by ggllbb
KeithWilson wrote:I have not yet set this up, which do you recommend? The electrician will wire whatever I ask him to do. I would like to be able to control it from a laptop.

If I don't have to buy a Sony RM-BR300 I don't want to. That's one expensive controller.


I had another suggestion earlier in this thread (May 29, 2012) to use a rs232 to Ethernet converter (about $100) at the camera. Then the laptop could be anywhere that the network (hard wired or WIFI) is available. I use those devices every day in my work and find them very reliable. The device is from GridConnect and is NET232-DCE or NET232_DTE. GridConnect also has one the connects directly to WIFI. You would still need to adapt the D9 connector to the DIN on the camera.

Digi Connect SP Serial 10/100 Ethernet Console Device Server RS232

Posted: Tue Jul 31, 2012 10:18 pm
by michaelfish
Here is another 10/100BaseT to RS232 adapter for $20 (eBay).

Digi Connect SP Serial 10/100 Ethernet Console Device Server RS232.

It is also available in a Wifi version.