Unable to connect to WiFi

Discussions about Internet service providers (ISPs), the Meetinghouse Firewall, wired and wireless networking, usage, management, and support of Meetinghouse Internet
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Biggles
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Postby Biggles » Tue Oct 30, 2012 3:34 am

When we actually get signed on, we frequently find a notice that says you are signed on to local but the Internet does not connect.


This sounds like a classic lack of IP addresses, as JD Lessley rightly stated!

Your STS will know the details about your network setup. He can contact the GSC (Global Service Center) to get additional IP addresses (WiFi connections) if that is what is needed to resolve your connection issues.

anitra
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Postby anitra » Tue Oct 30, 2012 1:31 pm

Thanks loads. Apparently the speed of our connection is 1.5, which will only handle one connection. Silly, very silly.

russellhltn
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Postby russellhltn » Tue Oct 30, 2012 1:34 pm

anitra wrote:Thanks loads. Apparently the speed of our connection is 1.5, which will only handle one connection. Silly, very silly.


Completely separate issue.
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aebrown
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Postby aebrown » Tue Oct 30, 2012 1:36 pm

anitra wrote:Thanks loads. Apparently the speed of our connection is 1.5, which will only handle one connection. Silly, very silly.


I think there's some confusion on the details. A 1.5mbps connection will handle many more users than just one. And you said in an earlier post that "We can sign on with only a few," which is certainly more than one.

The bandwidth of the connection can affect how many people can effectively access the Internet (depending on what kind of actions they are performing), but for the most part, the number of IP addresses that can be issued is a separate issue. In your earlier posts, it really sounds like the biggest problem you face is that your firewall is configured to issue a limited number of IP addresses. If bandwidth were your main problem, people would be able to connect (get an IP address), but performance for each of them would be slow.
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JamesAnderson
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Postby JamesAnderson » Wed Oct 31, 2012 2:00 pm

As to iOS devices, here's something from Blue Coat Systems, got this from a knowledge-base document on their support site, does not mention any specific hardware product of theirs, but does mention some reasons for not being able to access things when using Apple or iOS devices.

You have Apple devices in your environment and you are using IWA authentication (also applies to several other authentication methods). You notice that Apple users always fail authentication.

The problem lies in the design of Apple's software. While Windows machines are happy to provide the logged-on user's credentials to a proxy, Apple devices simply do not provide this data, even when explicitly queried. This will cause authentication to fail and users can not access the internet.

There are several possible workarounds, but they all aim for the same: No authentication attempts if the request comes from an Apple device (or authenticate them as a Guest user).

In OS X 10.6 Apple have started to support IWA. Mobile devices do not currently support IWA.

drepouille
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Postby drepouille » Sat Nov 03, 2012 10:49 am

I may be way out on a limb here. At home, I have a Netgear router that uses 5 GHz for the N signal, and 2.4 GHz for the G signal. I bought some super cheap 802.11n wireless adapters, only to find that they only work at 2.4 GHz. I was shocked, because I thought all 802.11n adapters worked at either frequency.

How does that relate the the original question? Well, if my super cheap adapters won't connect at 5 GHz, then maybe a super cheap netbook might have the same problem. Just a wild guess, however.

Dana in Omaha

russellhltn
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Postby russellhltn » Sat Nov 03, 2012 11:20 am

drepouille wrote:Well, if my super cheap adapters won't connect at 5 GHz, then maybe a super cheap netbook might have the same problem. Just a wild guess, however.


I have a couple of "n" devices and a cheap netbook. All of them work just fine with my 2.4GHz "g" router. A netbook that's sold with 5GHz only is going to have a high return rate. I'm thinking that since most devices have 2.4GHz already, the adapters you bought may have been sold with the idea of getting on to 5MHz.

It's an interesting idea, but it seems far-fetched.
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