Audio-Visual System Training for New Bishoprics

Discussions around meetinghouse sound systems, microphones, assisted listening devices, and translation equipment
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lhicks
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Audio-Visual System Training for New Bishoprics

#1

Post by lhicks »

Hi All...

Does anyone know of any training materials related to the new A/V systems recently installed at Canadian Chapels to which I can direct new Bishoprics and Ward Clerks? The ideal training material would be succinct and video-based with clear examples. Some of the newly called brethren are intimidated by the A/V system and others don't ask for assistance until right before they need to use it (Grrrr)!

Any guidance/suggestions will be gratefully received.

LITG,
Larry
lajackson
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Re: Audio-Visual System Training for New Bishoprics

#2

Post by lajackson »

lhicks wrote: Wed Nov 02, 2022 9:38 am Does anyone know of any training materials related to the new A/V systems recently installed at Canadian Chapels to which I can direct new Bishoprics and Ward Clerks?
If this was provided, I believe it would be a first, almost anywhere in the world. When our stake center was built, our audiovisual system training consisted of how to roll up and store microphone cords, the pulpit controls, and how to turn on the satellite sound (no longer needed). There was no training at all on any of the electronic equipment in the A/V rack. When I asked the question as the stake technology specialist who needed to figure out how to webcast stake conference and other meetings, I was told there were instruction manuals with the equipment. There were not.

Everything I learned about how to use the A/V system in our stake center I learned from the Internet by downloading the technical manuals for each piece of equipment in the rack. I learned how everything was connected by spending several evenings physically tracing the wiring from box to box. And then I experimented in my spare time.
russellhltn
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Re: Audio-Visual System Training for New Bishoprics

#3

Post by russellhltn »

Looks like someone has been hard at work in the wiki. Check out Meetinghouse Technology.
Have you searched the Help Center? Try doing a Google search and adding "site:churchofjesuschrist.org/help" to the search criteria.

So we can better help you, please edit your Profile to include your general location.
lajackson
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Re: Audio-Visual System Training for New Bishoprics

#4

Post by lajackson »

russellhltn wrote: Wed Nov 02, 2022 5:17 pm Looks like someone has been hard at work in the wiki. Check out Meetinghouse Technology.
That is a good, simple place to start. It does not help me much with the video processing and switching system, and the audio switching system in my 8-foot A/V rack, though.

On the other hand, most meetinghouses do not have the kinds of systems that newer stake centers have.
jamiep39
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Re: Audio-Visual System Training for New Bishoprics

#5

Post by jamiep39 »

Because there are so many slightly different versions and nuances per building, even of the same general systems, the best route may be to build your own training (if you're the STS, or ask the STS to build one) and provide that documentation where it can be accessed by those who need it, such as a Google Doc or printed copies in the media center, under the pulpit, etc.

If you are the STS and need further training, the FM group should be able to provide that or get someone to provide that.
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johnshaw
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Re: Audio-Visual System Training for New Bishoprics

#6

Post by johnshaw »

My experience is that anyone I trained doesn't retain the information unless/until it really is the rubber hits the road. I worked with 2 different brothers for nearly 2 years on a system that was brand new to church meetinghouses, it was the first meetinghouse with the system. I trained them on/off for 2 years. They helped with broadcasts, setting up multiple rooms, we had a separate language in a specific room, etc.. Additionally I had everything labeled, I had a 4 or 5 page booklet describing each type of scenario we'd encountered over the 2 years with EXACT instructinos AND Visuals. When I was released, they told the Stake President they had no idea how it worked and the SP had the Church fly in their people to 'train' them on it. A week later, they came to me asking how to set something up, so I walked up, pulled out the pages stored right in the track on the panel, labeled SYSTEM INSTRUCTIONS (for when John's not here) and turned to the page they needed. I watched as they followed it and had everything work.

That SP later told me he'd asked whether they'd talked to me and both of them told him they had and that the problem they were having was different which is why the pulled the church in.

One of the very nice things is my first assignment after moving to Utah shortly after this incident, I was supporting a Stake Conference held at the Ogden Tabernacle that had the same system. The HC couldn't ever get it to work, and for 2 years tried their best, I walk in, click, click, click and bingo. sometimes it does help to have someone called that can do the things they're asked to do. Just because you 'like' technology doesn't mean you can hookup a sound system, it doesn't mean you understnad how to switch between different video and audio inputs and direct those inputs to multiple outputs, but dog gone, it was super fun for me.

So there you are. I'm just not sure how this works. Sometimes you just get your hands dirty and figure it out. I have found over the years, once-in-a-while someone does exactly what I've done, then the next person doesn't do anything or care, and you've lost your institutional knowledge. It's why I think there are some operational aspects of how we do things that should just never be relied on by someone in a calling that could just as easily be released in a month or two or in there for 4 years doing nothing.
“A long habit of not thinking a thing wrong, gives it a superficial appearance of being right, and raises at first a formidable outcry in defense of custom.”
― Thomas Paine, Common Sense
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