Activity rate per age group

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Beinir
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Posts: 1
Joined: Wed May 02, 2018 2:50 pm

Activity rate per age group

#1

Post by Beinir »

Hello there!

I am a counselor in the stake presidency, and I was wondering if there is a way to see the activity rate per age.

I would like to see how many 12 years old are attending Sunday meetings in our stake, how many 13 years old, and so on until 18 years old.

I have tried many reports but no success.

Any ideas ?
eblood66
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Joined: Mon Sep 24, 2007 9:17 am
Location: Cumming, GA, USA

Re: Activity rate per age group

#2

Post by eblood66 »

Information at that level of detail is not captured in the church systems. The closest thing is the quarterly report and it only shows how many youth (ages 12-18 combined) attended at least one meeting in the last month of the quarter. There is no place to enter detailed attendance records in LCR.

So the only way to get that kind of information would be to ask individual Sunday School, YM and YW presidencies to compile it from written attendance rolls.
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johnshaw
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Joined: Fri Jan 19, 2007 1:55 pm
Location: Syracuse, UT

Re: Activity rate per age group

#3

Post by johnshaw »

Beinir wrote:Hello there!
I am a counselor in the stake presidency, and I was wondering if there is a way to see the activity rate per age.
If you call and speak with the General Young Men's Presidency organization they may be able to share with you, at least generically, the activity rate as it relates to those progressing in the Priesthood. So, you can see how many 12 year olds didn't get ordained a deacon, how many 14 year olds didn't move to teacher, etc... on up to Elder. They'll have it historically as well.

Unfortunately, there is no similar reporting for our young women. Maybe we'll smarten up and start calling and setting apart beehives, miamaids, and laurels, and members of the relief society so help us with similar data on that side.
“A long habit of not thinking a thing wrong, gives it a superficial appearance of being right, and raises at first a formidable outcry in defense of custom.”
― Thomas Paine, Common Sense
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