64-bits vs 32-bits

So you have the BIG idea that the Church or community needs to develop. Discuss that idea here. Maybe you just want to make a suggestion on a new forum topic. Let us know.
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thedqs
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#11

Post by thedqs »

nimebe wrote:Currently most machines are only capable of four chips and the maximum chip size is 1 gb. I said that the memory industry is unable to take advantage of the 64 bit system because I have yet to see a chip over 1 gb that would allow a consumer to use more than 4gb.

Actually current mem cards are 2 GB and I have seen some 4 GB boards meaning you can get a total of 16 GB of RAM. Now if you are taking about cost effective the 2 GB boards are coming down.

I make the distention between chips and boards because there are RAM 8-16 chips on a board and each chip is 64 MB to 512 MB in size while the board supports 1-4 GB and that is what you insert into your motherboard.

Another limitation is that you motherboard must be able to support that amount of RAM. Most now a days support 8 GB and some new ones support 16-32 GB.
- David
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thedqs
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#12

Post by thedqs »

nimebe wrote:Just for kicks I installed my Vista Ultimate 64 bit this weekend. The install went great and the system worked fine, until I tried to install my modem. Apparently my modem software used a 16 bit installer software. 64 bit systems apparently do not support 16 bit code. Seems I'll have to wait until someone releases a 32 bit or 64 bit Vista compatible modem before I'll be able to try again.

Did you try the compatibility check on the modem? Also did you try installing the modem under compatibility mode. (though it might install it might also cause the system to go unstable so proceed at your own risk)
- David
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#13

Post by nbflint »

so they are making 2+ gb chips now? I haven't seen them yet. I can't remember if I tried to install it under compatibility mode. Under the 32 bit version I don't have to use compatibility so I don't think it occured to me to try. This modem causes some unstability because it's an xp driver. I'm still waiting for someone to release a vista compatible 56k v.92 modem.

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thedqs
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#14

Post by thedqs »

Yea, I use pricewatch to see what "might" be out there and then I can look into it at my favorite online or offline retailer.

Pricewatch is not associtated with the church and is just a directory for finding deals on computer hardware.
- David
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#15

Post by vernondcole »

The problem with Desktop 5.5 being slow is not because it is on a 32 bit operating system. It is because it is on a 32 bit operating system crippled by anti-virus and feature bloat. The 256 Mbyte Dell in the clerks office is not enough machine for the add ons. My district president sat down at a clerk computer recently and didn't like the experience. He has directed me to buy more memory for all the clerk's office computers. That will help, but it will eat budget money. Multiply the price of a memory chip by the number of units in the Church and you get a pretty large chunk of change.
Now that Dell will ship our machines to us with Ubuntu Linux pre-loaded, we should think about using it. Ubuntu runs very well on 256 MB, and has Open Office already installed. Of course, MLS would have to learn to run in a user account - since there are no (activated) administrator accounts in Ubuntu. How hard could it be? MLS is written in Java, which is supposed to be portable. That sounds better to me than spending "the widow's mite" on RAM memory and license fees to the Richest Man on Earth.
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#16

Post by WelchTC »

kf7xm wrote:The problem with Desktop 5.5 being slow is not because it is on a 32 bit operating system. It is because it is on a 32 bit operating system crippled by anti-virus and feature bloat. The 256 Mbyte Dell in the clerks office is not enough machine for the add ons. My district president sat down at a clerk computer recently and didn't like the experience. He has directed me to buy more memory for all the clerk's office computers. That will help, but it will eat budget money. Multiply the price of a memory chip by the number of units in the Church and you get a pretty large chunk of change.
Now that Dell will ship our machines to us with Ubuntu Linux pre-loaded, we should think about using it. Ubuntu runs very well on 256 MB, and has Open Office already installed. Of course, MLS would have to learn to run in a user account - since there are no (activated) administrator accounts in Ubuntu. How hard could it be? MLS is written in Java, which is supposed to be portable. That sounds better to me than spending "the widow's mite" on RAM memory and license fees to the Richest Man on Earth.
MLS still depends upon some Windows code to send/receive information to/from CHQ. That is one issue that would need to be resolved. Other issues include training and support for Linux by CHURCH staff and local tech specialists.

Tom
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#17

Post by rmrichesjr »

tomw wrote:MLS still depends upon some Windows code to send/receive information to/from CHQ. That is one issue that would need to be resolved. Other issues include training and support for Linux by CHURCH staff and local tech specialists.

Tom
Regarding the need to train local tech specialists, I would guess there is already a large fraction of STS (and clerks) who have already used Linux and are at a level of expertise comparable to that of many/most on the current operating system. There are also a large number of other ward/stake members who could help. In my previous ward, there were at least a few of us using Linux every day. In my current ward, I know of at least three others who have used Linux.

What can the LInux users in this community do to help with training and support?
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#18

Post by bjhom-p40 »

rmrichesjr wrote:Regarding the need to train local tech specialists, I would guess there is already a large fraction of STS (and clerks) who have already used Linux and are at a level of expertise comparable to that of many/most on the current operating system. There are also a large number of other ward/stake members who could help. In my previous ward, there were at least a few of us using Linux every day. In my current ward, I know of at least three others who have used Linux.

What can the LInux users in this community do to help with training and support?
There are now a few distros where the learning curve is less of an issue. I think there may be enough of a user base that it should be something that is at least considered. I've been using linux for several years, but it wasn't until the release of vista that I was able to convince my wife to switch over.

But regarding using a 64 bit OS, I really don't think that there would be any noticeable difference.
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#19

Post by WelchTC »

rmrichesjr wrote:Regarding the need to train local tech specialists, I would guess there is already a large fraction of STS (and clerks) who have already used Linux and are at a level of expertise comparable to that of many/most on the current operating system. There are also a large number of other ward/stake members who could help. In my previous ward, there were at least a few of us using Linux every day. In my current ward, I know of at least three others who have used Linux.

What can the LInux users in this community do to help with training and support?
I'm sure that there are plenty of individuals that could help in some areas. In other areas, however, linux expertise is limited. Also, it is not so much a "technical" change as a "procedural" change. By this I mean that everyone is trained to call Global Help Desk 24x7. Now we would have to train individuals to call their local unit representative(s) to solve problems with machines. What is the escalation policy if the person(s) are not available? You get the idea.

I personally love and use Linux every single day. But I can see that it could take some time to get the infrastructure and training in place to make such a move. I've long thought that it would be a huge cost savings to move to Linux but I do believe after having been involved with some large deployments in the past, it is painful at first and can be expensive initially.

Tom
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#20

Post by rmrichesjr »

It is true large-scale deployments need to be done carefully and with a lot of forethought to the actual costs of making the change. Sometimes, near-term cost surprises happen.

I guess I don't see a need to train local people to do things differently. The unwritten rule already is that the first thing to do is to ask somebody locally, preferably the best available local expert. Now, bringing the global help desk staff up to speed on a different system is a cost that would have to be handled as part of a deployment.

If or when such a transition is considered, I trust you will let this community know how we can help.
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